These are badges that show you have learned how to properly 3D print and/or assemble one of the e-NABLE device designs. These badges are used within e-NABLE Web Central to determine which volunteers are qualified to make each of the different designs. For each e-NABLE design, there is one badge for fabrication (3D printing the parts) and another badge for assembly.


To Request a Badge:

To request a badge, do the following:

  1. Browse through the badges below to find the one you’re looking for
  2. Copy the badge title to your clipboard (or make a note of the exact badge name)
  3. Fill out the badge request form, pasting the badge name into the “Badge being requested” field
  4. Provide links to relevant evidence within the device request form (for device-specific badges, this would be a link to a video and/or photos of your device)
  5. Watch for emails from the e-NABLE Badging team (they may need more information or evidence)

In most cases, you’ll receive your badge within 2-4 days.

 


An Important Note About Assembly

The most common mistake when assembling e-NABLE Hand devices is improper tensioning of the non-flexible cords. When the non-flexible cords are tied correctly, the base of the palm should be inclined about 30-45 degrees compared to the base of the bracer (the part that goes over the arm). This will allow the recipient to activate the device without having to bend their wrist so far downwards as to cause discomfort.

Here’s an example of a properly tensioned Phoenix v2 Hand:

 

 

 

 

 


Unlimbited Phoenix Hand

Description: E-Nable Phoenix hand with thermo gauntlet. Choose left or right in Thingiverse Customizer and enter scale. All files needed will be generated and included in a single .zip file at the correct scale.

Designer(s): Team UnLimbited
STL Files

Source CAD Files: e-NABLE France created a re-build of the original Phoenix design, and those CAD files can be found on this Thingiverse page.
Instructions
Video Tutorial 1
Video Tutorial 2
Video Tutorial 3
Assembly materials kit


 

Unlimbited Phoenix – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Unlimbited Phoenix e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Unlimbited Phoenix – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Unlimbited Phoenix e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 

 


Phoenix v2 Hand

Description: This is a remix of the original e-NABLE Phoenix hand by Jason Bryant with replacement components by John Diamond, Scott Darrow and Andreas Bastian.

Designer(s): Jason Bryant, John Diamond, Scott Darrow, and Andreas Bastian

STL Files
Source CAD Files: e-NABLE France created a re-build of the original Phoenix design, and those CAD files can be found on this Thingiverse page.
Instructions
Video Tutorial 1
Video Tutorial 2
Video Tutorial 3
Assembly materials kit


 

Phoenix v2 – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Phoenix v2 e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Phoenix v2 – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Phoenix v2 e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 

 


Osprey

Description: This device was named the Osprey because it is a Raptor, but optimized for the use of heavy gauge nylon monofilament, most widely available as fishing line. The large mono has excellent Bowden properties, so the cables are pulled to provide flexion and pushed to provide extension. This device requires neither elastics nor springs nor any mechanical extension system.

Heavy gauge nylon monofilament is an excellent cabling material. It is generally inexpensive, and available as landscapers’ trimmer line, nylon or Bridge nylon 3d printer filament, and as deep sea fishing leader line. Running through joints, it doesn’t abrade at all, so there’s no “”sawing”” of printed plastic. Nylon is very strong, so it is rarely a point of failure for mechanical devices. But probably its greatest quality is its resistance to linear compression, so it pushes as well as pulls, like the bicycle cabling used to change gears.

Elastic resistance is a major drawback to many assistive devices, because resistance reduces a device’s grip strength. Furthermore, as an elastic-extended device approaches full actuation, resistance from elastics increases, so that it may be quite difficult for a user to grasp small objects. Designs which reduce or eliminate elastic resistance are a welcome development.

Pay particular attention to the new bill of materials. The Cyborg Beast, the original Raptor and the Raptor Reloaded hardware kits are not compatible with the Osprey. However, the Osprey does use the same hardware as the Gamma Raptor. Materials kits and tool kits should be available in the near future, so stay tuned.

Designer(s): Peter Binkley

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions
Video Tutorial
Assembly materials kit: Contact Peter Binkley


 

Osprey Hand – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Osprey e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Osprey Hand – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Osprey e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Raptor Reloaded

Description: The team behind the original Raptor has released the Raptor Reloaded, an updated and re-factored version of the Raptor Hand. The entire device was modeled in Fusion 360, a free CAD tool that can import and export most standard solid body modeling formats such as STEP and IGES. By designing the hand in a tool compatible with numerous CAD packages, we hope to lower the barrier to contribution to the e-NABLE project for engineers and designers. Previously, if a designer wanted to make a small adjustment to a part of a hand, they’d have to rebuild the entire part in their CAD software before they could make the change. Now they can download the source files and just spend their time making the specific change they had in mind. With this new set of source files, we hope to improve the pace of research and development within the design community.

Important Note: Statistical data on hand testing quantitatively shows that the Raptor should not be recommended as a functional design (at least for pinching tasks). Instead, consider the Phoenix v2, Unlimbited Phoenix, or Osprey.

Designer(s): Andreas Bastian, Ivan Owen, Peter Binkley, Frankie Flood, Skip Meetze, Jon Schull, Peregrine Hawthorn, Laird Popkin, and Jeremy Simon

STL Files
Source CAD Files
Instructions
Video Tutorial 1
Video Tutorial 2
Assembly materials kit


 

Raptor Reloaded – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Raptor Reloaded e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Raptor Reloaded – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Raptor Reloaded e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Talon Hand

Description: This is a wrist-powered device, so the user needs a wrist to be able to actuate the fingers.

Version 3 of the Talon Hand is easier to build and more comfortable to wear than the Talon Version 2 and it still offers the superior grip strength and effortless actuation of version 2.7

Designer(s): Peter Binkley and Peregrine Hawthorn

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions
Video Tutorial 1
Video Tutorial 2
Assembly materials kit: Not available


 

Talon Hand – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Talon Hand e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Talon Hand – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Talon Hand e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Cyborg Beast

Description: Most voluntary closing devices including this design need sufficient wrist movement and strength for proper function. This design doesn’t require Orthoplastic. The fingers are designed for better gripping and to avoid over extension of the proximal phalange and distal finger segment. It fits a 1 to 2 mm cabling and elastic bands.

Designer(s): Jorge Zuniga, Ph.D

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions
Video Tutorial 1
Video Tutorial 2
Assembly materials kit


 

Cyborg Beast – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Cyborg Beast e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Cyborg Beast – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Cyborg Beast e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Ody Hand v2.1

Description: This hand is intended to be a starter hand for children with no fingers, a small palm and some ability to flex and extend the wrist. I decided on two fingers and a thumb, so that Ody would only be fighting the resistance of three digits. Short, blunt fingers reduce the chance of putting one’s eye out. v2.1 is a new and improved design. Now there are pins and proximals of different tolerances. For most situations, print the “A” pins and three of the “A” proximals. The “B” set is for large (adult-sized) prints and/or underextruding printers. The cable channels in the fingers have also been widened so it’s easier to install the cables.

Designer(s): Peter Binkley

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Source CAD Files
Instructions
Video Tutorial
Assembly materials kit: Not available


 

Ody Hand – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Ody Hand e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Ody Hand – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Ody Hand e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Flexy-Hand 2

Description: 2nd iteration of the Flexy-Hand. It is now wearable.

Extra features include:

  • Gauntlet attachment via Filaflex hinges
  • Two length/widths of gauntlet available
  • Sculpted palm socket
  • Discrete internal tendon channels
  • Adjustable tensioners
  • Discrete glove attachment channels (or alternative “”Chicago Fastener”” method)
  • Left and right hand versions
  • Scaleable.

Designer(s): Steve Wood (Gyrobot)

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions
Video Tutorial
Assembly materials kit: Not available


 

Flexy-Hand 2 – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Flexy-Hand 2 e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Flexy-Hand 2 – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Flexy-Hand 2 e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Phoenix Reborn

Description: This is a Remix of the Phoenix Hand & UnLimbited Arm, designed by Albert Fung. This project is a collaboration between e-NABLE Sierra Leone and the Hong Kong Maker Club.

It became apparent in our previous feasibility study that for the 3D printed prosthetics to survive the tropics, we need to remove components that are not well-adapted to hot weather. We therefore set out to replace all the rubber bands in the Phoenix hand.

Palm: We used the One-Arm palm designed by below_cho as out starting point. All the cable tunnels have been widened, the knuckle stumps removed, and a bar is added at the thumb base for tying elastic cord.

Palm mesh: we have modified the thick palm mesh by John Diamond to strengthen the screw holes.

Fingers: Tunnels have been created so an elastic cord can now run all the way from the finger tip up into the palm.

Pins: For snug fitting, some of the pins have been resized and reshaped.

Designer(s): Ed Choi – Derived from designs by Albert Fung, below_cho, John Diamond, Team UnLimbited, Jason Bryant, John Diamond, Scott Darrow, and Andreas Bastian

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions: Not available
Video Tutorial: Not available
Assembly materials kit


 

Phoenix Reborn – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Phoenix Reborn e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Phoenix Reborn – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Phoenix Reborn e-NABLE hand design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Gripper Thumb Terminal Device

Description: The Gripper Thumb TD is an experimental terminal device for upper limb amputees that looks like a passive cosmetic prosthesis, but it performs two-handed tasks without a Bowden cable.. Since the 3D printed device is still experimental, it should not be used without the clinical supervision of a Certified Prosthetist or Occupational Therapist. Special care should be taken in selecting the printing materials to assure that there are no layer adhesion issues or other durability concerns.

Designer(s): Skip Meetze and Jon Schull

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions
Video Tutorial
Assembly materials kit: Not available


 

Gripper Thumb Terminal Device – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Gripper Thumb Terminal Device e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Gripper Thumb Terminal Device – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Gripper Thumb Terminal Device e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


K1 Hand

Description: An elegant, anthropomorphic hand that utilizes commonly available materials and 3D Printing. There is no metal hardware and all cords are recessed for aesthetic purposes and for a better quality user experience. This hand is intended for adults and young adults – including female veterans, teens going to prom, or an individual going to a job interview.

The anthropomorphic design and recessed cords allow the user the option of wearing a glove over the device.

Designer(s): Evan Keuster

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions: Not available
Video Tutorial
Assembly materials kit: Not available


 

K1 Hand – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the K1 Hand e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

K1 Hand – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the K1 Hand e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Knick Finger

Description: This 3D printable DIY prosthetic finger is ideal for those missing two finger segments, though it can be configured for one knuckle as well. Many options are configurable, so with the right measurements and tweaking it should be adaptable to most people’s needs – though it takes some trial and error to get a perfect fit.

Designer(s): Nicholas Brookins

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions
Video Tutorial
Assembly materials kit: Not available


 

Knick Finger – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Knick Finger e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Knick Finger – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Knick Finger e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Unlimbited Arm v2.1

Description: Team UnLimibited are very proud to release version 2.0 of their UnLimbited arm design; named the Alfie Edition after it’s first recipient.

The UnLimbited Arm 2.0 is fully parametric and customisable using Thingiverse Customiser to produce all the files correctly scaled based on a recipients real world measurements.

This is the next generation deviced based upon the popular 1.7 Isabella edition that was released last year.

Designer(s): Team UnLimbited

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions: Not available
Video Tutorial
Assembly materials kit (Don’t forget to get extra velcro straps)


 

Unlimbited Arm v2.1 – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Unlimbited Arm v2.1 e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Unlimbited Arm v2.1 – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Unlimbited Arm v2.1 e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Po Arm

Description: This is the latest model of our prosthetic for trans-radial amputees. It as body actioned device for kids and grown ups. Instructions for priting and assembly are posted below. We’ll keep updating this prosthetic, as well as continue uploading more of our designs.

This work was inspired by the Unlimbited Arm team with their thermoforming technique, the Funmove forearm system, GiveMeFive’s flexy arm, Christian Silva’s works, and the always amazing flexyhand by GyrobotUK

Designer(s): Po Paraguay

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions
Video Tutorial: Not available
Assembly materials kit: Not available


 

Po Arm – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Po Arm e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Po Arm – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Po Arm e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Flexy Arm

Description: An arm design derived from the Flexy Hand 2 from Steve Wood (Gyrobot).

Designer(s): Christian Silva – derived from designs by Steve Wood (Gyrobot), Jon Schull and Skip Meetze

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions: Not available
Video Tutorial: Not available
Assembly materials kit: Not available


 

Flexy Arm – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Flexy Arm e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Flexy Arm – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Flexy Arm e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.

 


Kwawu Arm

Description: The Kwawu Arm has been redesigned to be more natural looking and more functional. The terminal device has a much higher grip strength and functionality. Very good at picking up small things with index finger and thumb and big things with the whole hand.

This version is similar to the original thermoform Kwawu arm. It is suitable for a recipient with a long residual forearm.
There are two other versions on thingiverse: A Socket Version for people with short forearm residuals, and a terminal only version for people with a standard forearm socket already.

Designer(s): Jacquin Buchanan

STL Files
Source CAD Files: Not available
Instructions
Video Tutorial: Not available
Assembly materials kit: Not available


 

Kwawu Arm – Fabrication

Description: This badge is for anyone that has 3D printed the Kwawu Arm e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to photos showing the 3D printed parts, with enough detail that the print quality can be clearly seen

Kwawu Arm – Assembly

Description: This badge is for anyone that has assembled the Kwawu Arm e-NABLE design.

Evidence Required: Links to a video and/or photos of the assembled device. While not strictly required, a video is strongly preferred. Post a video on http://youtube.com of the device and provide the video link in the badge request form. The video can be unlisted if you don’t want it to show up in public YouTube searches. Make sure the video includes the following: (1) Introduce yourself. (2) Manipulate the device and show its functionality. (3) Show the print quality. (4) Show that it is adjustable when applicable. (5) Show print features closely and highlight any problems in the test print. (6) Stress test – manually attempting to bend fingers and other solid parts. (7) Where did the design come from? (8) What type of printer did you use? (9) Explain what challenges you encountered and how they were addressed.